Category Culture

L’Oru: Enter and follow the creative instinct

This is a wonderful chance for the island’s creators to be given the opportunity of being viewed, admired, followed and promoted. It was in December 2017 that L’Oru opened its doors in the centre of Ajaccio.We can thank Marie-Valentine Carette for this initiative; she chooses and contacts creators from all over the island, thus proposing a variety of products for public appraisal and inviting all of those interested in discovering natural talent which is not always accessible, for various reasons.


The area is spacious, welcoming and comfortable. I had the pleasure of meeting Antoinette Defranchi Filippi, who offered a very cordial greeting. The principle is quite simple...

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Catching up with: Fred Poggi

It was high time to meet up with Fred Poggi once again, and discover all his news since 2014 (my previous article relating to Voce Ventu for their generous, inspiring and talented contribution to the musical scene in Corsica). With this encounter, I wished to learn more about Fred’s personal thoughts, hopes, achievements and fears. 


Well, for one, and which certainly must be taken into consideration, Fred has become a father since our last chat – this, of course, has considerably changed his rhythm !  And, since 2015, he has been enjoying composing music for films – i.e: Les Exilés, Beatrice (Rinatu Frassati) and a documentary...

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When Agatha Christie came to Coti-Chiavari

Let’s go back to the coast, towards Coti-Chiavari, north of Porto-Pollo, and retrace a walk that Agatha Christie had done in 1926. As recalled by Marie-Jean Vinciguerra (Literary Chronicles), the English novelist disappeared after a period of misfortunes that coincided with her return from Corsica – as she confided in ‘My Life’.


So, where did the famous novelist go on the island

Let’s look for a lead, following her character Mr Satterthwaite, who accompanied an eccentric English duchess in ‘Mr Quinn on a voyage’ (short story from The World’s End). Following Ajaccio, the two English people from Agatha Christie’s story go to Coti-Chiavari, a village which at that time was composed of ‘five or six stone houses’...

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Conversing and exchanging views with: Author/Journalist Robert Colonna d’Istria

My first impulse would be to state that it’s an impressive and vast world, that of Robert Colonna d’Istria – whose career has led him through many choices of fields of work. Author, journalist, lecturer, inspector of historical monuments, collaborator of various newspapers and magazines – to name but a few.

A question struck me concerning his most recent publication: Une Famille Corse, 1200 Ans De Solitude (A Corsican Family, 1200 years of Solitude). Was this a decisive choice for an accomplished career ?
Not really, no. More so a reflection on the island, the Corsicans themselves and how they differ from elsewhere; a type of examination would be a more appropriate way of defining this proposal – however, not only – it is also an interrogation on his own family and his very own story...

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A few words on: The Chestnut Flour Mills in Corsica

The sweet chestnut tree – symbol of Corsican culture and identity.  

Chestnut flour is a product that has been rediscovered by the public these past few years, regaining popularity.
And, although it grows in many European regions, it is in Corsica that this tradition was and remains one of the oldest and the strongest.
In 2008, Corsica groups together 35 chestnut flour mills, exclusively devoted to this production. All of those who, in metropolitan France started making the flour for the past fifteen years, come to Corsica in order to study it.
Bernard Biancarelli reminds us that the miracle of the Corsican chestnut is due to Genoa.
‘It is true that Genoa, ruler of the country since the XVI century, obliged the Corsicans at the end of a vast program of agricultural development, to plant fi...

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