Category Heritage

Napoléon dies in Saint-Hélène

In 1807 at Iéna, Hegel catches sight of Napoléon from afar – overwhelmed, he then writes: ‘I saw the world’s soul on horseback’.
On Saturday May 5th 1821, at 17h49, the Emperor of the French delivers his last breath, on the heavily guarded small island of Sainte-Hélène. ‘Born on an island, to go and die on an island, on the borders of three continents’ – according to Chateaubriand’s words, who admired him as much as he fought him. Napoléon I probably succumbed to stomach cancer, after six years away from the world.

A few resolute people accompanied him in his exile – including two generals, Montholon and Gourgaud, the Count of Las Cases, to whom he dictated his memoirs, the grand marshal of the palace Henri Gatien Bertrand and Louis-Etienne Saint-Denis...

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A few words on: Calenzana Castle

Built between 1852 and 1854 by some 300 men, this castle used to be the home of Pierre Napoléon, Napoléon Bonaparte’s nephew – until 1870. Member of Parliament for Corsica at the Constituent Assembly of the Second Republic, Pierre was also the most controversial Napoléon of his time. Known for his legal escapades in the US and afterwards in Rome, he was several times  involved in murders. The warm-blooded Napoléon was also a soldier, at first at the sides of Santander in Colombia, then in Algeria, where he took part in the battle of Zaatcha. Known for being President of the General Council of Corsica, his troubles nevertheless earned him to be ineligible by the Emperor himself. He eventually died in Versailles, in 1881. 

The castle remained in the family until 1925, when the...

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Cape Corsica: Home of admirable tombstones

Just like the ‘palazzi’ (mansions), the great noble houses, the monumental  tombstones are very much part of the architectural heritage of Cape Corsica. They were built between the late 17th and early 18th century, near hamlets and facing the sea. These were of course, external signs of wealth and the expression of a powerful link between the living and the dead. Along the road in all the villages of Cape Corsica, and always well in sight, impressive sepulchres are erected. Built by emigrants from this part of the island, or by the families of notables, these ‘mansions of the dead’ combine tombs and altars for celebrations, thus producing authentic funerary chapels.

The interior is often decorated with sculptures, paintings, candlesticks and precious monstrances...

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A Strada Antica

This is a memory trail and millenary path, connecting the coastal plains of Purtichju to the Altu Taravu – handed down from prehistoric times. Beginning at Purtichju near the old medieval hamlet of Frassu, followed by the Col Saint Georges and Bocca di San Ghjorghju – it joins the old road from Ajaccio that used to connect the villages to the city and the lands of the plain. After crossing Bocca di Lera, significant crossroads, it then arrives near the Casteddu di Bozzi, an important feudal castle – situated precisely at a strategic point in order to control the territory, and the road network. It then continues to Tassu, near a Bronze Age castle and also a menhir – joining Bocca di Vizziluca, linking Bastelica and the Prunelli Valley...

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The Old Mines and Lake of Argentella

Situated at 23km from Calvi and 14km from Galeria, they can be reached by the coast. At the foot of Capu di Argentella (813m above sea level) the mining galleries can be observed and are around a forty minute walk away from the buildings. 


These mines go back to the 19th century, and have not really been exploited since 1910. The buildings belonging to the old factory and the open-air galleries are today in a state of dilapidation. One can find traces of mining activity dating from 1572, when a silver mine was opened by the Genoese. Applications for concessions were made in 1847, but it was not until 1870 that major works were carried out, with developed activity of the mine. Buildings were built, along with a dam in Crovani Bay, and the Julia Port was completed...

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