A suggestion for a seasonal dessert: Christmas Chestnut Log

It’s certainly time to start thinking of what you will serve over the festive season, so here’s an idea that may interest you !
A Christmas Chestnut Log – straight from Corsica

Ingredients for the sponge:                                                         
100g chestnut flour
5 eggs
100g sugar
1 packet vanilla sugar

Now for the chestnut cream :
150g chestnut cream
2 egg whites
20cl liquid cream
100g sugar
2 gelatine leaves
100g broken chestnuts

Syrup :
50g sugar
1 glass of water
lemon zests
1 glass eau-de-vie/brandy

Roll the cake. Take 2 large bowls, and in the 1st break 4 eggs, putting the yokes aside. Add sugar to the yokes (both sugars). Mix well until smooth. Add the remaining whole egg and remix...

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A few words on: The Chestnut Flour Mills in Corsica

The sweet chestnut tree – symbol of Corsican culture and identity.  

Chestnut flour is a product that has been rediscovered by the public these past few years, regaining popularity.
And, although it grows in many European regions, it is in Corsica that this tradition was and remains one of the oldest and the strongest.
In 2008, Corsica groups together 35 chestnut flour mills, exclusively devoted to this production. All of those who, in metropolitan France started making the flour for the past fifteen years, come to Corsica in order to study it.
Bernard Biancarelli reminds us that the miracle of the Corsican chestnut is due to Genoa.
‘It is true that Genoa, ruler of the country since the XVI century, obliged the Corsicans at the end of a vast program of agricultural development, to plant fi...

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Types of chestnuts that can be found on the island

There are several varieties of chestnuts here in Corsica.

The ‘Rudulacciu’ is very fruitful, giving three chestnuts by chestnut bur – the fruit literally bends the branches of the trees during the autumn season.
The ‘Vicu’ can be easily recognised by its fruit; they fall with their chestnut burs and remain conserved for a long time.
As for the ‘Poarupa’, it only gives two chestnuts by chestnut bur, but they are quite beautiful. We cannot really name all of the varieties, as there are many, but, we must mention the ‘king of chestnuts’ – the ‘Zerubia’ – of a wondrous size, giving two chestnuts by chestnut bur and highly recommended for drying.

The most common varieties are the following:
‘L’Insitina’ of medium size and good quality, also known as ‘Orezzinca’ or ‘Campanese’.
The ‘Pitrina’ or ...

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Speloncato in the Balagne area has several particularities, and worth learning more about.

Built around 570m above sea level, and situated up north of the island in Balagne, overlooking the Reginu Valley and also the Balagne coastline. It’s about thirty minutes from Île Rousse also belonging to crystalline Corsica, due to the granite rocks.

In 1621, the Capucins built the Speloncato Convent out of stone and lime, which could be found not far from the cemetery. It fell into ruins, and since then has been transformed into dwellings. It used to be famous for the Carignelli waters, which were known to cure kidney stones. One of the springs also supplied water to the convent.

The Santa Catalina church from the XI century stands in the middle of the village square, in front of the village fountain dating back to 1879...

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Let’s take a closer look at our legendary wild boar: U Cignale

Here’s another emblematic figure from the Island of Beauty, immortalised a few years ago in ‘Astérix in Corsica’.
The legendary wild boar is a powerful and robust cousin of the pig. His coat is dark, and his legs are short – he is stocky, and has a low rump.
The male is equipped with two short defences, which prove to be extremely impressive during fights, or over the mating season from November to December.

The wild boar feeds on acorns, chestnuts, roots, fruit and truffles, that he unearths; using his snout to plough the ground – this also gives that strong, authentic taste to his meat.

Hunting wild boar in Corsica is a true institution...

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