Art in Corsica

landscape-of-corsica-Matisse

The influence of Baroque Art

It would appear in the middle of the 17th+18th centuries, and under the influence of Genoa, Baroque Art predominated Corsica. The artists possessed a specific style and have been known to influence other artists in fact. We could say, there were two predominating periods: the pre-Romanesque and the Pisan, and to this day certain monuments are still in existence, one of the finest examples would be the Baptistery of St John the Baptist, situated in Corte.

The islands principal art gallery would undoubtedly be the Fesch Museum, in Ajaccio, where an impressive and also permanent collection of Italian art can be viewed, dating from the 14th century...

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“Wine is bottled poetry”

grapesRobert Louis Stevenson pronounced these fitting words, leaving us in reverie and expectation

Benefiting from microclimates, a large variety of soil and soaked sun summits, the island produces some of the finest varieties of wine to be found. Tasting takes place all over the island, where 9 ‘appelation d’origine controléé’ can be discovered. Sometimes unknown to the general public, as much of the wine is sold on the island, with exports increasing over recent years. Possessing a strong personality, these wines are well worth your taking the time to discover and enjoy...

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The Corsican language and its role today

panneau de signalisation corseAs I wrote earlier on, Corsica does possess its own language

Part of the ‘Romance’ languages, mainly spoken within families and villages and handed down throughout the centuries. Very close to dialects from central and southern Italy, musical and charming – it was finally recognised as a language in 1960. The noticeable variations, depending on where one is on the island, is also quite apparent. Traditionally oral, the development of the ‘written’ has gained considerable ground over time. In 2010, the Charter of the Corsican Language was signed, to increase the use and visibility in public stretch and social life, and through the ongoing efforts where schooling and courses are concerned, the desire to achieve bilingualism is the ultimate aim...

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A symbolic choice of flag

drapeaucorsePascal Paoli officialized the Corsican flag

Representing a black Moorish head on a white background, several hypotheses have been advanced as to the origin. Paoli would have stated: “The Corsicans want to see clear, freedom must walk the torch of philosophy, one might say that we fear the light”. It also appears that the Moor’s head was represented on the flag of Arrigo della Rocca, leader of Aragon in 14th century Corsica. To be noted also, during the Italian Renaissance, a Moor’s head was an emblem of Cagliari and Sardinia, and could have appeared on the emblem of the mercenaries, resulting in both Corsica and Sardinia possessing the same flag.

Appearing on maps and within documents throughout history, it could be confirmed that the beginning may well have gone as far back as the 1...

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