Convent of Corbara, a haven of peace

St Jean Corbara

Solid religious representation has left its mark all over this incomparable island. The Convent of Corbara is once again a fine example of the alliance between Corsica and religion. Situated between the mountains and the sea, towards the north of the island, in the heart of the Balagne – this picturesque site ensures serenity,  harmony, prayer and hospitality. Dating back to 1430 and is the largest illustration to be found, where Pascal Paoli is said to have visited many times, often accompanied by friends. Guy de Maupassant also made a halt here, amongst others, and wrote one of his articles.

Having been registered to both the Dominicans and the Franciscans through the past, it is today occupied and run by the Brothers of St. John...

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Abyss – International Festival of Underwater Images and Aquatic Worlds

ocean and yellowspotted burrfish
This week in May holds many days off, and one of the highlights has been the International Festival of  Underwater Images and Aquatic Worlds, which took place at the Palais de Congrès, in the centre of Ajaccio. For its first year of initiation, this festival held quality and a world of information, for those who had the opportunity of attending. Documentaries, films and conferences over two days, supported by enchanting underwater images, a world to discover/rediscover with full appreciation and needless to say, the Mediterranean also held an important role here, with a special regard to the ray and shark family. For amateurs of photography, a competition was held for underwater images, and the possibility to photograph the wreck of a world war II P40 Curtiss fighter.

I particularl...

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In every curving beach, in every grain of sand – there is the story of the earth

P.MalaterreThe obvious is often taken for granted, and it wasn’t until I had roamed around the island, unaware that I was in fact very often sampling the sand, that I realised how this natural component influenced my whole outlook on the beaches and their surroundings.

When you do not possess the choice, you accept what you are given or shown, but, when the possibility is there for the taking, this reveals a totally new horizon of vision – I adapted these reflections to sand within which,  in every grain – there is the story of the earth ..
I found myself choosing a particular spot depending on my humour of the moment, and having discovered the personality of each type, my imagination too delighted in entertaining this expression...
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Extract from: ‘The Lighthouse on the Sanguinaires’ by Alfonse Daudet

Sanguinaires Islands (GraZiella)

I was reminded of a bad spell of insomnia I had three years ago, when I lived in the Sanguinaires lighthouse overlooking the entrance to the Gulf of Ajaccio, on the Corsican coast.

I had found a pleasant place, where I could muse in solitude.

Picture an island with a reddish cast, and a wild appearance. There was a lighthouse on one headland, and an old Genoese tower on the other, housing an eagle when I was there. Down by the sea-shore, there was a ruined lazaretto, overgrown with grass. There were ravines, low scrub, huge rocks, wild goats and Corsican ponies trotting about, their manes flowing in the breeze. At the highest point, surrounded by a flurry of seabirds was the lighthouse, with its platform of white masonry, where the keepers paced to and fro...

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Cargèse – otherwise known as ‘The Greek Village’

Cargèse Jean-Louis Delbende

This is not a random choice of village I choose to tell you about

I vividly remember my first visit there and how I was completely drawn to its particularity. Right in the heart of the village, on the outskirts, overlooking the floral countryside and valley, one comes face to face with two churches standing right opposite each other : Greek Orthodox and Roman Catholic – in the midst of overlooking trees and in total harmony.

I recall catching my breath and just gasping. Situated 100 meters above sea level, it seemed so natural and yet so singular. Cargèse was founded at the end of the 18th century, by Greek immigrants, having been chased by the Turks – whereupon their descendants build their own church, whilst the Corsicans built theirs...

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